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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  [private user] 13 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #37433

    [private user]
    Participant

    Colleagues: I have reviewed several web pages (listed below) pertaining to laptop ergonomics. Some of the information was good, some contradictory and some, IMO, did not flow well for the reader. Here’s my shot (draft, attached) at a more linear approach that I hope is also more easily visualized by a diverse audience. Photos would be better, but for now, text is sufficient for my purposes. If you wish to offer CONCISE and CONSTRUCTIVE criticism, or a good link, I’d appreciate it.

    Thanks, David

    Related Links:
    Laptop Ergonomics Haworth Laptop/Notebook Computers and Ergonomics http://www.haworth.com/haworth/assets/Laptop%20Computers%20and%20Ergonomics.pdf

    MacWorld Laptop ergonomics (need to scroll down quite a bit) http://www.macworld.com/2005/12/secrets/janmobilemac/index.php#content

    UC Berkeley Are you using your laptop unsafely? http://www.uhs.berkeley.edu/facstaff/pdf/ergonomics/laptop.pdf

    Harvard Ergonomics For Using A Laptop http://huhs.harvard.edu/Resources/HealthInformationByTopic/RepetitiveStressInjuriesRSI/ErgonomicsForUsingALaptop.aspx

    Cornell University Ergonomics Web – Tips for Using a Laptop Computer http://ergo.human.cornell.edu/culaptoptips.html

    MIT Laptop ergonomics and tips on using laptop computers http://web.mit.edu/atic/www/disabilities/rsi/laptopergo.html

    University of Minnesota Laptop Ergonomics http://www.dehs.umn.edu/ergo_office_laptop.htm

    #38666

    JeffdlS
    Participant

    A very good guide, IMHO.  There are some phrases that could be phrase differently.  For the second General Laptop Tip, I would’ve said "Refrain from placing a pillow or other soft materials directly under the laptop as they may block the fan grill and cause potential damage to the laptop."  But otherwise, I find it very useful.Jeff de los Santos

    #38671

    [private user]
    Participant

    David,

    I think 18" is too close for a recommended minimum viewing distance for laptops. I prefer to see a minimum of 20".

    Also, 30" should not be a "back-end" limiting distance; if they can see it clearly and comfortably at a further distance, that should be fine.

    JeffDr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    #38680

    [private user]
    Participant

    I have not seen anyone mention it but the CDC, Center for Disease Control, does not recommend using laptops as the primary computer in the office. I completely agree with this recommendation because I am seeing several of my colleagues who use laptops all day long having significant eye issues including blurriness, headaches, eye fatigue and soreness in addition to poor posture related to leaning forward toward the small laptop screen to improve focus on the tiny characters on the laptop screen. If the user has no choice in using a laptop as his or her primary computer for hours out of the day, then I suggest lots of mini breaks by closing the eyes for 5 to 10 seconds at a time to give the eyes a brief rest, put moisture back into the eyes and to simply check the eyes for potential problems. There’s also the "20/20/20" rule which states that for every 20 minutes a person spends viewing a screen they should spend 20 seconds looking outward at least 20′.

    #38681

    [private user]
    Participant

    Tom,

    I agree and it’s not always the laptops but just about ANY display that is "overused".

    Glad to see someone remembered my "20/20/20" rule….!!

    Jeff
    PS. And don’t forget those yearly eye exams!!Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    #38689

    JeffdlS
    Participant

    If the laptop is used as the primary computing source, I’d think you’d want to increase the size of everything to make everything more readable.  Thus you aren’t straining your eyes as much.Jeff de los Santos

    #38690

    [private user]
    Participant

    Well, maybe… Remember that LCDs have one native resolution so changing the size degrades the image quality.
    And making the objects larger gives the user less "real estate" to work with, thus increases scrolling (and decreases productivity).

    It all seems to go together….

    Jeff A.Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

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