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This topic contains 13 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  lmm 10 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #36593

    lmm
    Participant

    I would welcome any suggestions for a client I am working with that has both lowback and neck issues. The work involves watching a bank of 3 on 3 montiors for 8 hours. The monitors are fixed in position. The keyboard and mouse are height adjustable.

    #40820

    gmaurits
    Participant

    Hello Louise:

    There are many factors to consider when looking at pain and discomfort in a computer setting. The neck discomfort may be from how the monitors are set up? In evaluating this you need to take into consideration if the worker wears glasses or not? does the worker wear bifocals? These will alter the positon of the monitor completely. For a person without glasses the top of the screen should be at eye level of the worker. A person with bifocals will require the monitors to be lower so that the worker can look through the lower part of the lens without having to tilt his/her head back which over time would create pain and discomfort. I have worked with people with multiple screens and what I do is make sure that the primary monitor is diriectly inline with the worker and the other screen is positioned adjacent to the primary monitor and slightly angled in. This allows for easy viewing with minimum head movement. Monitor placement is importatn as well, a monitor should be placed within arms reach of the worker. If placed further, the worker would need to strain to read the material on the screen as well if the worker has difficulty reading the material they may tend to lean forward placing them in a poor ergonomic posture.

    As for the lower back discomfort, I would suggest to look at the chair and how it is adjusted for the worker. As well talking to the worker about taking micro breaks from the computer is a good idea as it gives the body a brief time to recover from extended sitting periods.

    Hope this helps, good luck

     

     

    #39771

    akg
    Participant

    One word of caution when dealing with bifocal users viewing monitors (single or multiple).

    The near lens is prescribed for a 12"-14" distance (normal reading), and is not suitable for montior viewing (at arm reach – say 25"). Thus neither the far portion of the bifocal or the near portion provides a clear focus at the monitor distance. The bifocal user has to hunch forward and extend the neck (leading to a "vulture" neck posture) to try to ease the situation.

    Bifocal users who need to look at monitors continuously need full-field intermediate distance glasses (sort of special reading glasses prescribed with the reading material held at arm length) or "occupational progressive" glasses – which have a broader middle-distance wedge compared to conventional progessive lenses.

    #39774

    [private user]
    Participant

    Good reply! I want to RE-EMPHASIZE: "regular" progressive lenses rarely work for desktop computer use (laptops are sometimes OK). The "intermediate" viewing area of a regular progressive lens is WAY too small for most desktop displays.

    And remember that bifocals were invented by Benjamin Franklin- who had no idea that people would be wanting to use computer screens to work! (bifocals are on their way out anyway….)

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    #39776

    akg
    Participant

    Thanks. Would you elaborate on the "sometimes" please? (laptops are sometimes OK).

    Anindya

     

    #39777

    [private user]
    Participant

    It depends on the viewing distance (which in laptops is often dictated by the length of someones arms). If they prefer to have a close-enough working distance; and the power of the reading portion of the lens is low enough (offering a greater depth of focus), then a regular progressive lens (PAL) might do. If the powers get too high or the viewing distance too far (longer arms….), then may not work.

    It’s pretty much a trial-and-error challenge….

    hope that helps

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    #39748

    akg
    Participant

    Thank you

    #39783

    admin
    Keymaster

    Louise we just completed exactly the same situation for 12 hr employees.  We implemented a 24 hr ergocentric high back chair with adjustable neck rest. The guys are using open body angles and viewing the screens from almost a slightly reclined position. They can see all screens without lifting their head. We had to put in fully adjustable keyboard trays to support this and ensure that their arms are also fully supported with articulating arms.

    Debbie Schwartzentruber

    Manager of Ergonomics

    Maple Leaf Consumer Foods Canada

    Canadian Certified Professional Ergonomist

    #39785

    [private user]
    Participant

    Hey Debbie,

    Wouldn’t happen to have a picture of that setup to share, would you?

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    #39786

    admin
    Keymaster

    HI Jeff – hey always read your input with interest – yes we will get you a picture – its at a location 1 hour away so it will likely be next week sometime –

    Debbie Schwartzentruber

    Manager of Ergonomics

    Maple Leaf Consumer Foods Canada

    Canadian Certified Professional Ergonomist

    #40822

    lmm
    Participant

    Thanks Debbie. That is what I was contemplating. I look forward to seeing the picture.

    #39803

    [private user]
    Participant

    You may also want to consider placing the monitors on an arm that will allow vertical adjustment so the workers can adjust during their shift between a sitting, standing, and sit/stand position.  A completely height adjustable workstation may also be the ticket for that so the keyboard adjusts with the monitor.   Ergonomic Concepts and Mayline come to mind… 

    Karl Marion  

    #39900

    sandra2714
    Participant

    Hello

    All great suggestions, but I am not sure that the original question was fully answered. I too am having a bit of trouble with a switchboard operator who views 4 monitors (2×2). Screens are 17". The workers are complaining  of neck discomfort. Is anyone aware of any research based guidelines available for suggested mutilple screen set up.

    Thanks

     

    #39902

    [private user]
    Participant

    Sandra,

    If "2×2" means that they are 2 across and 2 vertical, I’d opt for all four in a row lower toward the desk. That should take care of the neck issue. Make sure that they have chairs that move freely and that the monitors that they look at the most (the "home" displays) are directly in front of them, with the "peripheral" ones to the sides.

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

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