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This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  ErgoMaine 15 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #36790

    ErgoMaine
    Participant

    Are there any guidelines or limits for repetition as it relates to lower-extremity injuries? There is a plethora of information on upper extremity injuries and repetiton rates, but I haven’t turned up anything for lower extremity. I am interested in repetition rates for foot pedal use among sewing machine operators and other machine operators.

    – Maureen

    #42218

    IraJanowitz
    Member

    Hi,

    The only paper I know of that directly addresses this issue is in Croatian:

    Reumatizam. 1989;36(1-6):57-9.

    Becirovic E.

    Functional and morphologic examinations of the feet of 100 sewing-machine-workers have been performed, and a comparison with a control group. The relative frequency of radiological changes was similar in both groups, most commonly on metatarso-phalangeal joints, on the tarsus and in the form of a spine of Achilles tendon. However, clinical and functional changes were significantly more often on the feet of sewing-machine-workers, which were perimalleolar oedema, metatarsalgia and hallux valgus. The changes are more often and serious parallelly to the age and duration of employment, they are more common on the forefoot, and markedly influence the working ability. Concerning the shape of foot, more changes were found on an “egyptian” than on a square foot. Summation of microtraumas and previous changes on the foot (before getting employed) contribute to the development of the found changes.

    PMID: 2491406

    In addition, however, you may wish to check:

    Brisson, C., M. Vezina, and A. Vinet. 1992. “Health Problems of Women Employed in Jobs Involving Psychological and Ergonomic Stressors: the Case of Garment Workers in Quebec.” Women and Health 18(3):49-65.

    Chan J, Janowitz I, Lashuay N, Stern A, Fong K, Harrison R. Preventing musculoskeletal disorders in garment workers: preliminary results regarding ergonomics risk factors and proposed interventions among sewing machine operators in the San Francisco Bay Area. Appl Occup Environ Hyg 2002;17:247-253.

    Nag, A.; Desai, H.; Nag, P.K.: Work Stress of Women in Sewing Machine Operation. J Human Ergol 21:47-55 (1992).

    Punnett, L. and Keyserling, W. M., 1987, Exposure to ergonomic stressors in the garment industry: Application and critique of job-site work analysis methods, Ergonomics, 30(7), 1099 – 1116.

    Please keep in mind that there is considerable static load in using electric sewing machines (vs. the treadle-operated ones my grandmother used), and that it’s not all about repetition.

    #42228

    ErgoMaine
    Participant

    Thank you for the article references.

    Chan J, Janowitz I, Lashuay N, Stern A, Fong K, Harrison R. Preventing musculoskeletal disorders in garment workers: preliminary results regarding ergonomics risk factors and proposed interventions among sewing machine operators in the San Francisco Bay Area. Appl Occup Environ Hyg 2002;17:247-253.

    This article has some good recommendations on chairs for sewing machine operators: seat pan length less than 19″ so that leg has unobstructed use of thigh to promote ankle flexion. Need good lumbar support.

    I will keep digging. If I come up with more info, I will post.

    Thanks again!

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