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This topic contains 13 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  [private user] 11 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #36530

    [private user]
    Participant

    I have a client hospital system that has asked me to help them improve their Job Descriptions as they have just moved into a new facility with a lot of new equipment and and larger departments, more walking etc.  They have a 1 page report called a Functional and Environmental Evaluation for each job and want to update these for the new hospital and make improvements.  Main idea is to make these most useful to a physician who is treating an injuried worker so the physician can be clear in making any work restrictions based on what the job actually requires physically.

    Any recommendations from anyone who has done a project like this is appreciated, re: best practices for such a form.  Thanks

    Brian A. MacDonald, DC, QME, CAE

    Doctor of Chiropractic

    Qualified Medical Evaluator

    Certified Ergonomist

    (415) 370-9868

    #39593

    ergoplus
    Participant

    I have a similar question with regards to JDA’s and their application to job postings and modified return to work. Are there formats available to link JDA’s to FCE’s, objective job requirements, application to MRW’s, etc. Any info would be appreciated.

    #39599

    sallen
    Participant

     My suggestion would be to evaluate the existing form, determine if it is a form that needs to be followed and evaluate the physical demands for the different positions.  For these to be legal docs you must evaluate the essential functions of each job title, i.e., what are the minimum requirements for lifting, carrying, pushing, pulling….

    We have done thousands of these over the years.  Some folks call them Job Analysis and some are now calling them Functional Job Descriptions.  They typically are used to design ADA/EEOC Pre-employment or Post Offer Assessments, used to develop a Fit-For-Duty Assessment and for Return-to-Work determination.

    They tend to be a very useful to HR, Case Managers and Employers.

    Be sure to use scales, push/pull gauges and digital photos.

    Hope this was helpful.

     

    #39600

    sallen
    Participant

     Don’t know of any specific program that would "compare" FCE’s to Functional Job Descriptions – there are FCE testing devices that use their own software and compare the DOT data and the actual FCE results. 

      Some folks tend to believe that more is better.  Frequently the reports have really little to no real value for the MD, CM, employer or patient. 

      Then specific information from the FJD can be used in the FCE to help determine if an individual is capable of performing specific work tasks/essential functions.

     

    #39603

    ergoplus
    Participant

    Thanks Scott,

    What format are you using to design the ADA/EEOC Pre-employment or Post Offer Assessments? Does one ask a potential candidiate if they can push x number of pounds, or lift x number of pounds? Do you carry out the garbage? How much does it weigh??How does one word this objective data into a job interview or return to work scenario?? Or, in fact, do we actually take the time to get these potential employees/RTW’s to physically do these tasks? What about a position that requires a high repetitive rate. Do we simulate this during the interview or bring them back for a trial day? Time is money and human resources. FCE’s can certainly give us indight for the injured worker but does the Manager of Food Services understand what the person’s push/pull max is or that their heart rate rises after x number of minutes doign x number of lifts? So many Managers are not capable of relating the objective to their needs.

    Comments are welcome.

    #39608

    [private user]
    Participant

    We have used a standard Job Analysis with physical, behavioral and environmental demands since the 90’s it works great for return to work for employees.  We also have the blank forms for the physicians to fill out that match the Job Analysis, that way you are comparing apples to apples for return to work.  Feel free to email me at [email protected] and I will email you the examples and the forms.

    #39610

    sallen
    Participant

    Nice Sandra – yes, we use to do that also but the Doc’s in TX have to use other required forms and wont fill out ours anymore.  Still the JA’s are helpful to them and are even hard for the "difficult" docs to refute!

    Keep up the good work!

    Please send samples and forms to [email protected]

    Always great to have other input!

     

    #40802

    ergoplus
    Participant

    Thanks Sandra. I have to agree with Scott re the docs participation with such forms but am certain they could be helpful to Occ. Health staff and Managers. It isn’t rocket science!! Please send the examples of your forms to [email protected]

    Many thanks. And I am sure you, Scott and I can continue this dialoque.

    Sue

    #41193

    [private user]
    Participant

    Sandra,

     

    Thank you for your reply regarding functional job descriptions and offering to share some samples of forms you use.  I will send you and email to your em address listed.  I am delayed in responding to your post as I have been out of town for the past two weeks and away from email much of that time. 

    Brian A. MacDonald, DC, QME, CAE

    Doctor of Chiropractic

    Qualified Medical Evaluator

    Certified Ergonomist

    (415) 370-9868

    #39625

    SafetyJohn
    Participant

    In response to your request for information, consider the end user first.  If it doesn’t work there, it’s useless even if it’s pretty, detailed, what have you.

    We use a three page form, two are narative and the third is 6-9 pictures actually demonstrating common activities.  Sometimes the doctors simply cross out the pictures of restricted activies.

    This becomes a seperate component of the full job description containing essential functions and other details that only distract the doctors and consume most if not all of the 20-30 seconds attention they offer.  Not a slam, just reality.  Drop an email if you’d like a sample.  This same general format works well for restricted duty.

     

    John Shervey – 253-630-1656

    [email protected]

    #39629

    mike
    Participant

    I agree with Scott, you need to make sure the FJD actually reflects the requirements of a job.  Often times why these forms are not helpful, is because they are so generic.  If you are going to use them to determine RTW or even for post offer screening, then they need to be detailed and validated.   After I do a FJD, I will have it reviewed by the associates who actually do the job, get their input and then also set up a 20-30 minute test(which is also validated by employer and associates).   This test will require the associate to perform the lifting, reaching, positioning  etc. of the job to demonstrate ability to perform.   Once this test is determined to be a valid and reliable example of the job in question, then this can be used to determine the individuals ability to RTW, after injury, and also for any future new hires.   I am a PT who works in the work comp. field and probably 75%+ of the job descriptions I get from the employer, is useless in determining actual demands of the job in question.   When I review the job description with my patient and it says they must lift 75lbs, but when the patient states ‘I have done that job for 7 years and have never lifted 75lbs’  I know I don’t have any reliable info to base a RTW status on.

    FJD can be a very useful tool, for rehab, doctors, employers and employees, but are often not used because of the lack of detail.   Just my thoughts, thanks

    #40702

    Gene
    Participant

    You might start with the Handbook of Abilities (http://openlibrary.org/b/OL1467305M/Handbook_of_human_abilities) which is the standard text on human abiiities, including physical abilities.

    These abilitiy constructs are also used by the US Dept of Labor and their online job analysis tools.  A lot of information is on the DOL site at: http://online.onetcenter.org/

     

    Gene Carmean
    Projects Director
    MED-TOX Health Services
    3350 Shelby Street, Suite 200
    Ontario, California 91764
    http://www.med-tox.com

    #40918

    JB
    Participant

    Good topic and discussion.

    As a certified Kinesiologist who has bee providing obective analysis of the physical components of "work" for some time now……I’ve found there is no standard rather than a system of making things clear to employers, physicians, and insurance companies about the physical components of a job.  I will attach a basic template that I use that can be padded with info as needed, which I have used a  guideline for such assessments.

    Tips…..video camera to capture the essential components of the job, scale/force gauge to capture avg and peak forces for load handing, tape measure to measure as many horizontal and vertical heights of the workstation/s, and a really good narrative interview from more than one employee/supervisor about the position.  The video camera is the perfect medium to compliment your digital photos in report when trying to comment on the number of lifts/carries/reach etc that occur in a typical shift.

     

    Remember your audience….I’ve done 14 plus page comprehensive reports that a referral has said….."that’s great…now can you provide me with a summary that I can give docs/insurers/etc…..pictures are worth a thousand words of REGULAR postures/duties

    It appears the attachement is not allowed….email [email protected] for the template…info is meant to share :)

    Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]

    #40712

    JB
    Participant

    Here is the link to a web page that I have thought to be a great resource for PDA’s:

    http://www.ohcow.on.ca/resources/handbooks/PDA/pda.pdf

    Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]

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