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Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • [private user]
    Participant

    Dave,

     

    As always a professional, academic post.  I'm so glad you referenced McGill.  I have his BackCare text and have incorporated some of his exercises into my personal regieme. 

     

    Beverly Burke RN CMA CIE


    [private user]
    Participant

    Dave: 

    As usual its nice for me to read your notes.   I am interested in pain, and pain perception also.  Are you familiar with the work of Bruce Mcewan from Rockefeller University? He is interested in spinal cord relays.  He has several articles and a book on pain.
    Professor Bruce McEwen of Rockefeller University in New York City, an expert on the topic, has written a book called The End of Stress As We Know It.
    See what you think.

    Best wishes,
    bev burkeBeverly Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: neutral posture stand up #38780

    [private user]
    Participant

    I read this post with interest.  It has been my practice to recommend electrical height adjusting work surfaces for sit/stand operations over any other option as it offers quick adjustment changes for the monitor and the keyboard, the two basic computer inputs.   Other options seduce users/buyers into a cheap fix, but is it really a fix if the equipment change is time consuming or the physical risk factors are shifted to some other category?Beverly Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: Chair for Tailbone Injured Worker #43465

    [private user]
    Participant

    Re; the original post about tailbone problems, Reimers chair manufacturers’ RFMseating.com, has done a custom tailbone cut in the past. 
    I am really interested in the ergo-sitter discussed in this post, the Swedish chair with the back end that releases towards the floor.  Has anyone actually experienced a sit in this chair?  If yes, please share your experience.

    Thank you.Beverly Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: calculating turning radius #44432

    [private user]
    Participant

    David:

    Thank you very much for this helpful and rich link.  I will peruse at my pleasure.

    Sincerely,

    Bev BurkeBeverly Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: Ergonomic Issues in Steel manufacturing industry #43398

    [private user]
    Participant

    I expect you will be confronted with backs, backs and more backs.  The only thing that would interfere with your analysis of back pain and injury will be the large number of shoulder problems you must have.  With shoulder problems, come the hands…its just one big kinematic chain.  I have worked in a foundry as a consultant where the big issue is to reduce force as much as possible.  Some  easy solutions exist, like adding proper sized wheels/casters in certain operations.  You may have difficulty just dealing with the biggest ideaological problem, ‘but we have always done it that way.’  Since Peter Budnick will be talking with you, I am sure he will give you information on what has been done.  You will be working hard to describe the message to your work group and move forward. 

    Best wishes to you,
    Beverly Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: ergotron monitor arms #44040

    [private user]
    Participant

    Thank you for the link to your preferred products. I am looking for a single arm to hold and position a Monitor/monitor/ Laptop configuration. I have not yet found a manufacturer of such a product who provides ease of adjustment, reliability and a reasonable, albeit expensive price. The items are out there, but in my experience, they are not very well engineered for the price they are asking.

    bev burkeBeverly Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: stool height chairs #38694

    [private user]
    Participant

    Thanks to all Ergoweb participants for their replies:  Here is what I found out.

    I am most happy with the Neutral Posture NexTep , as a solution for stool height seated workers.  NP has other options, the Fring, a flattened foot ring, and the N-tune, two footstool options.  The Fring seems to me to be a better solution than a standard ring, because it offers a greater surface for the foot to rest, distributing sole contact stress over the wider surface. Research on this statement?  I don’t know about any, I draw my statement from physiological logic;)).  The NexTep is a clunky, albeit safer option for someone sitting at stool height, since the entire sole of the foot can rest.  This device will take quite a bit of force, so it can take some weight getting in and out of the chair.  If you need a surface to take full user weight getting in and out of the chair, then the N-tune, most clunky, but safest option seems the best.  Beverly Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: gardeners; grounds keepers #37942

    [private user]
    Participant

    Hi Mike:

    My reference to staging describes the worker evaluating the task first, then putting tools, and equipment in ‘best locations’ to complete the work. For instance, providing all the tools necessary at a site prior to starting the task, rather than just plunging right in and then finding that one has to go back and forth to a tool shed or truck to complete the work. The back and forth issue is more physically demanding, and not very productive.

    Re: David’s presentation, I can send it later, if you would like.

    Best wishes

    Bev Burke


    [private user]
    Participant

    It is interesting to view this discussion about Swiss ball seating. I will state up-front that I am not a fan of this item in a work environment. I do believe the ball has good application in a rehab environment, and by stating that I suppose that if a person is in an early return to work environment,i.e. a workers compensation environment, then ball seating MAY be helpful to train the body to improved seated posture.

    Years ago, ergonomist Marv Dainoff produced a chair with a convex seat. The shape that is presented to the seat of the user is the same shape presented to a user with the Swiss ball. One aspect of the anatomical logic of the Dainoff seat was to postion the ischium on the downward side of the seat pan curve. As far as I know the chair didn’t last long, it wasn’t accepted as ‘comfortable.’ I thought it was wonderful.

    Many chair designs are eliminated by the consumer because they are uncomfortable, even though a lot of design logic has been put into their manufacture. That being said, I believe a lot of the Swiss ball magic is related to its novelty. Novelty is good for stimulation, and it sounds like many of the Swiss ball users are getting stimulated to understand their bodies in a new and improved way. I think the best place for this is to get away from the desk entirely and to take some time in the day for yoga, tai chi, chi gong or meditation. The underlying problem to most ergonomic issues is fatigue. If we break up the unending physical requirement to produce, produce, produce then our health will improve and our injury rater will reduce. We will also put other deserving souls back to work.

    in reply to: gardeners; grounds keepers #38312

    [private user]
    Participant

    Thanks for the information. I also got a nice presentation from David Wolfe done by Iowa State.

    Having looked at the injuries at this location, one of their biggest problems, is lack of staging. I haven’t seen the equipment yet, trying to schedule.

    in reply to: Lateral Epicondylitis and Forearm Pronation #41557

    [private user]
    Participant

    James:

    Thank you for the enlightening description of the forearm response to hand position. I’m often trying to visualize forearm motion when the upper extremity is moving through its complete range of motion, ROM. Your clear description is one I will save, and refer to.

    thank again,

    Bev Burke RN CMA CIE

    in reply to: Lateral Epicondylitis and Forearm Pronation #41430

    [private user]
    Participant

    Dear User:

    Its unlikely that her injury is just due to pronation. It’s more likely to be the finger flexion/gripping of the mouse and the whole arm compression that accompanies people working under time pressure. Environmental noise, auditory and visual also impact muscle compression.

    You could ask her to try moving the mouse to the other non-dominant side, with the accompanying changes to the keyboard tray, and/or provide a different type of input device, either a trackball or a touch screen surface.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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