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  • in reply to: Force to break finger, break skin and bruise? #39243

    [private user]
    Participant

    It may seem grim but I can imagine this kind of study conducted on cadavers. I can also imagine an immediate application of the results as well: law enforcement and social workers need the results to help them evaluate injuries in senior care facilities. I can imagine there’s more than a few people who stand accused of injuries to senior adults who might exonerated if this information was available.

    I do hope that the original question was directed at determining the limits of manufacturing processes but without a more complete background to the original query, it’s hard to know!


    [private user]
    Participant

    I work as the Safety/RM Coordinator (and whatever other hat needs wearing!) for a public entity on the Oregon Coast and when one of the data entry folks in our Assessor’s office had bi-lateral carpal tunnel surgery, I knew she would have a hard time with job re-entry if we didn’t make some changes. Luckily, the first thing I tried worked: I bought a Kenesis Keyboard with foot control for her to use. It would be a wonderful world if we could just discontinue the activities that cause us physical distress but that’s not always the case and this person really wanted to keep working. 

    We both believe that the keyboard saved her job and I think there was a couple of factors that made that possible: the first was that the keyboard has such a steep learning curve that she had to slow….way….down to learn to use it; the second was that the motions for her fingers were so drastically different compared to a standard keyboard that it reduced the impact from the CT "release" procedure. She’s been using a Kenesis keyboard exclusively for almost 15 years without any flare up from CT. 

    It may be one of the things you want to try.

    in reply to: Ergonomics of Bus Riding #38885

    [private user]
    Participant

    I can’t address the seating related issues but I do know that a company in Portland, Oregon made their name retrofitting motorhomes with anti-sway bars for motorhomes and larger vehicles (as well as supplying aftermarket Volvo car parts) Their web address is: http://www.ipdusa.com/. They might help you address the movement of the bus chassis.

    Regarding the use of bus rides to transport employees, I do know that Samsung in S. Korea has a fleet of busses which transport employees daily. My daughter is a Samsung employee and has never mentioned the bus ride as so uncomfortable that she would rather seek other transportation. It makes me wonder if the lumbar support/foot rest configuration is so limiting in position options that it makes the problem worse instead of providing solutions.

    Good Luck!

    in reply to: optimal height for non-adustable equipment #38766

    [private user]
    Participant

    Russell, I had to confront similar situations in my public entity because they had not yet moved to adjustable height workstations but were willing to purchase ergonomic chairs. What I did was to modify the component that I could work with, the chair height with various sizes of foot supports constructed by the maintenance department.

    If you want to keep the costs down, go with and adjustment that will fit the tallest worker and place platforms of varying heights under the other workers. If you’re lucky, the workforce is stable and you won’t be changing platforms often but even if you do, the savings in injuries and the gain in efficiencies will make it worthwhile. I bet if you spend a little more to make the platforms adjustable for a range of heights, you’ll save that cost in the long run too.

    I sincerely hope I haven’t misread your description of the setting and suggested an impossible solution!

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