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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 171 total)
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  • in reply to: Need suggestions for use laptop in the car #41259

    [private user]
    Participant

    What types of input are they using? (laptops? Tablets? Cell phones??)

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting


    [private user]
    Participant

    I don't imagine the "image stability" would be any more of an issue for a tablet as it would for a newspaper or book. The eyes are usually pretty good at tracking that slight shifting around of the image, assuming it's a "jiggle" rather than a "wind shear" on an airplane!

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Desk/Computer Job Ergonomics (Golfer’s Elbow) #40991

    [private user]
    Participant

    Cardinal,

    I may not have the complete answer but a few things jumped out at me:

    1. Taking vitamin B complex is good for "nerves" (conduction speed) but I'm doubting that your problem is nerve related; might be a joint problem.

    2. You say that your elbows are at 90 degrees, which I believe is too "tight"; I'd open it up to 120 degrees- allows better blood flow to the area.

    3. Your monitor is too high- top of display should be at eye level.

    4. Question: is the monitor straight in front of you? If not, that could be an issue.

     

    just some thoughts

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Multi-Monitor Ergonomics #40957

    [private user]
    Participant

    Doc,

    Sounds like you have it under control- for the most part. The "common suggestion" for display screens is closer to 2-3 inches BELOW eye level, not above. SO, if you could lower those bottom monitors a bit, that's likely the best position. Make sure the chair swivels to offer less neck twisting. Wearing glasses??

    Jef

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Which tablet/ebook reader is “easier on the eyes”? #40430

    [private user]
    Participant

    Thanks Steve- and good points. Especially the brightness factor; and this goes for desktops as well. We tend to think "brighter is better" but it's more important to have good contrast between letters and background. The brightness should be adjusted according to the surrounding illumination, but it's either not available (as you mentioned) or not thought of in the mind of the user. This is where much of the "eyestrain" issue comes from.

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Which tablet/ebook reader is “easier on the eyes”? #40428

    [private user]
    Participant

    Tom,

    Take a look at this comparison: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20009738-1/kindle-vs-nook-vs-ipad-which-e-book-reader-should-you-buy/

    Yes, short on research but covers several aspects of the various models out there. 

    I recall seeing ONE study on a comparison of the iPad2 vs. Kindle for reading but this was several years (and models) ago. Seems that the iPad2 (pre-retina display) was perceived as the least preferred reading medium despite being rated high on readability (yeah, sounds strange to me too!)

    So, I guess it depends on the "usual" factors: viewing location, viewing habits and visual abilities.

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Computer Monitor Size- when is too big? #40425

    [private user]
    Participant

    Theresa,

    Yes, it's getting crazy with larger and larger monitors coming into the workplace (and then there is the "multiple monitor" issue too!!)

    However, it's not the size of the monitor that is an issue but the size of the fonts on it. It's a combination of the size of the font, the viewing distance and the visual abilities of the user. As you might see, there is no "slam dunk" answer. The font size must be about 3X the maximum viewing ability of the user to be comfortable to see (eg, if they see 20/20 at that distance, the letters need to be 20/60 size). If the viewing distance is too close (to get those letters effectively larger), then the eyes might start "straining", depending on their visual ability.

    Another issue- a more significant one that I see- is the height of the monitor. They not only get bigger but they get "taller" and therefore users are looking at a more elevated viewing angle and that is a signficant source of visual stress. I still like to see the top of the monitor at OR BELOW the straight ahead line of sight, with a 10-15 degree backward tilt of the top of the monitor.

    Hope this helps!

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Glare on 27″ iMac #40260

    [private user]
    Participant

    Check with 3M to see what sizes their anti-glare filters are appropriate for that screen.

    Surprising that the environmental changes haven't helped- have you modified the brightness of the monitor itself? Where is the glare coming from?

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Bi focal Glasses #44789

    [private user]
    Participant

    Kim,

    Remember that standard bifocals were invented by Ben Franklin….who had no idea that they were to be used for computers!!!!

    While the general recommendations suggested by the other responders are not "wrong", there is a better way: Occupational Progressive Addition Lenses (OPALs). These allow the computer user to see the screen clearly in the upper portion of the lens and the keyboard and other closer material clearly through the bottom. They are NOT, however clear for distant vision.

    All bifocal AND REGULAR PROGRESSIVE lenses that are indicated for "full time" (including distance viewing) are going to require users to tilt their chins up to see the screen clearly. The PAL (standard progressive) has an intermediate viewing section in the lens but it is so narrow that most people do not like it and tilt their heads anyway to get the benefit of the wider reading zone (but also requires moving closer to the screen since it's more power).

    Let me know if you need more information on these. (their eye doc should be aware of these and recommend them).

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: 4 Monitor Setup #40862

    [private user]
    Participant

    Marek,

    The eyes work more efficiently going side-to-side rather than up and down, and even more so when all the objects are at the same viewing distance. I'd stick with the "arc" setup and make sure that they have a good swivel chair so that they can sit directly "facing" each monitor as they use it.

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Break reminder light – Quirky idea #40210

    [private user]
    Participant

    Nice idea but I seem to recall something "similar" a few years ago…didn't go very far. Likely the same reaction as any "take-a-break" software: figure out a way to ignore it. The only difference here is that they'll have something to throw across the room….. ;-)

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Anthropometrics of the Eye #40018

    [private user]
    Participant

     What specifically are you looking for? If it’s a new way of viewing through ophthalmic (note the correct spelling) equipment, there is a company who exhibited at the last Ergo Expo that converted microscopic lenses into a viewing screen. Can’t recall their name but I’m sure Ergo Expo would have it.

    Or are you looking at something to rest against a patient’s face to support a magnified viewer?

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: micro-breaks and rest breaks #39973

    [private user]
    Participant

     I believe "Eye Defender" is free….similar break-type program.

    Jeff

     

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: micro-breaks and rest breaks #39962

    [private user]
    Participant

     Sharon,

    For computer users, I always recommend the "20/20/20" rule: every 20 minutes, take 20 seconds and look 20 feet away from their screens. Works WONDERS to relieve computer vision syndrome….!! (assuming they DO it!!)

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

    in reply to: Ergonomics Improvements for Visual Distortion #39999

    [private user]
    Participant

    Joan,

    Sounds like you’re doing everything right but full spectrum bulbs won’t likely make any difference; however, removing TWO of those fluorescent bulbs might be better.

    How old is she? How long ago did she have the baby? She needs to also see an EYE doctor as well….

    Jeff

    Dr. Jeffrey Anshel

    Optometrist

    Corporate Vision Consulting

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 171 total)
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