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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 45 total)
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  • in reply to: Writing job descriptions with required physical abilities #40918

    JB
    Participant

    Good topic and discussion.

    As a certified Kinesiologist who has bee providing obective analysis of the physical components of "work" for some time now……I’ve found there is no standard rather than a system of making things clear to employers, physicians, and insurance companies about the physical components of a job.  I will attach a basic template that I use that can be padded with info as needed, which I have used a  guideline for such assessments.

    Tips…..video camera to capture the essential components of the job, scale/force gauge to capture avg and peak forces for load handing, tape measure to measure as many horizontal and vertical heights of the workstation/s, and a really good narrative interview from more than one employee/supervisor about the position.  The video camera is the perfect medium to compliment your digital photos in report when trying to comment on the number of lifts/carries/reach etc that occur in a typical shift.

     

    Remember your audience….I’ve done 14 plus page comprehensive reports that a referral has said….."that’s great…now can you provide me with a summary that I can give docs/insurers/etc…..pictures are worth a thousand words of REGULAR postures/duties

    It appears the attachement is not allowed….email [email protected] for the template…info is meant to share :)

    Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]

    in reply to: Leg Strength Data #40635

    JB
    Participant

    David,

    The ARCON Functional Ability Evaluation system, with the most recent software, has normative data for client performance during Static Leg and Static Torso lift testing.  This information provides a comparasion based on age, weight and gender  to the average based on one voluntary maximal effort.

     

    Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]

    in reply to: Grip Strength #39414

    JB
    Participant

    The ARCON system contains normative data when testing clients as part of a post offer or reactively during a rehabilitative process that will compare their demonstrated gripping abilities to normatives indicating they demonstrate either low, normal or high grip strength abilities.

    I think I know where you are going with your question….much like when we are asked to identify what is repetitive…..which definition do we use.. I don’t know of any specific definition of Light, Moderate or Firm other than the normatives identified.  There is an article that is identified as part of the FCE software resources for ARCON that you may be interested in:

    http://fcesoftware.com/images/5_Grip_and_Pinch_Norms.pdf
    Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]

    in reply to: Visual Inspection of pharmacuetical product #39290

    JB
    Participant

    I thought you might be interested in the following links taken from the Workers Safety Insurance Board (CANADA).  This info is not copyright protected and encouraged to reproduce and distribute…the way it should be to assist with advocating injury prevention….Kudos to WSIB

    http://www.wsib.on.ca/wsib/wsibsite.nsf/Public/PreventMSD

    See "MSD Prevention tool box"Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]

    in reply to: Current ergonomic consulting rates #39288

    JB
    Participant

    I charge 75/hour (canadian) which is the billable rate for travel, on-site, and report writing.  Presentations are dependent on time frame/content of material to be developed/and resources required.Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]

    in reply to: Visual Inspection of pharmacuetical product #39287

    JB
    Participant

    Michael,
    It would seem reasonable to have someone qualified to consult with your organization to perform an ergonomic risk assessment.  This way, the observation of a number of your employee’s reaching, grasping, and handling practices could be objectively recorded.  A thorough review of all accessory tasks/duites should also be performed (PDA reviewed) to ensure other components of the job may not be contributing to your employee’s reported wrist pain.

    Unfortunately, more information is required to provide you with a clear and concise answer to your question. Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)
    Director of Kinesiology/Occupational Services
    Movewell Rehabilitation
    [email protected]


    JB
    Participant

    NikkiD3,
    A PDA or Physical Demands Analysis is an objective assessment that identifies the essential duties and tasks associated with a position.  It further identifies the strength and mobility frequencies of these tasks breaking them down into their primary elements.  The report that is generated can identify the most physically demanding component of the job and can be used to identify ergonomic areas or concerns.

    An ergonomic assessment firstly identifies the subjective or perceptions of the position, and then through analysis of the PDA on file may identify potential risk or hazzard that may need to be further analyzed to reduce the likelihood of musculoskeletal injury.

    I have been performing Assessment Services (including PDA’s and Ergonomic Assessments) for over 10 years and would be more than happy to discuss this further.  You could email my work at [email protected] for further discussion.Regards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)

    PRO-ACTIVE Injury Rehabilitation Centre

    800 Princess St, Suite 400

    Kingston ON

    in reply to: mouse for de Quervains #39075

    JB
    Participant

    Good morning everybody,

    In full agreement and have found great success with the recommendation for the Evoluent vertical mouse.  I feel so strongly about this application.  Let’s discuss…..everybody place their elbows at their sides with arms flexed at 90 degrees and wrists in neutral (thumbs up position).  Now rotate hands so knuckles are facing up (pronated)……Can we all agree that this is an end range of elbow pronation?  This is a posture that we should be avoiding for sustained or repetitive periods….it just so happens that this is also the posture required of the traditional mouse.

    Check out the evoluent mouse and note the difference: http://www.evoluent.ca
    I am not a salesman for the product, just an advocate.

    Kind Regards,

    John BragdonRegards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)

    PRO-ACTIVE Injury Rehabilitation Centre

    800 Princess St, Suite 400

    Kingston ON


    JB
    Participant

    Interesting that this has recently generated some buzz as we had received a pamphlet, in the mail, on "The Walkstation" just yesterday.  One word…..novelty…..as was the use of swiss balls as task seating.  As stated in previous posts…..risks will outweigh benefits which in my opinion would be minimal.  Those advocates will most likely be salesmen of the product and those in support will most likely be sticking their neck out for lawyers to hack it off in court from disability claims associated with falls etc.

    This just screams red flag……….as does using swiss balls for task seating……how many treadmills are purchased to become dust collectors or clothing hangers.  Begin as a good intention.  This is in no way a negative spin on the product, just an opinion.

    Regards,

    JohnRegards,

    John Bragdon, BSc. Kin, CK(OKA)

    PRO-ACTIVE Injury Rehabilitation Centre

    800 Princess St, Suite 400

    Kingston ON

    in reply to: Transparent anti-fatigue mats #42683

    JB
    Participant

    Advocate for proper footwear/custom orthotics for employees…..why purchase transparent anti-fatigue mats? Just a thought. The days of antifatigue are coming to a close…..eventually. They actually increase torsional force from ankle up through the kinematic chain.

    Show me an employee with comfortable feet and I’ll show you a smile!!

    in reply to: Plantar Fascitiis and prolonged standing? #42590

    JB
    Participant

    Good day,

    10 yrs experience. Orthotic provider. The answer is YES, there is a correlation. A foot with poor support/cumulative stretch force to plantar surface can inflame resulting in “plantar fascitis”. Wear supportive footwear and have fitting for custom orthotics if required to stand for prolonged periods.

    I’m not biased……it’s a plane fact that most feet require increased support. Why wouldn’t we want more suspension. I’d be happy to discuss further.

    in reply to: Upper Extremity Exercises – Illustrations #42196

    JB
    Participant

    Suanders Exercise Express or Tools RG is a good user friendly software package. Just google it………and it will come……………

    in reply to: Anti-Fatigue Mats #42046

    JB
    Participant

    I am of the opinion that anti fatigue mats do not replace the effects of good supportive footwear (with or without orthotics). Studies have shown (I’m sure someone has the reference…I’m on the clock) that antifatigue mats may increase torque forces to the ankle knee and hip complex. The comparison has been made that (exaggerated a bit) it is like wearing cleats on a grassy field. Pivoting through the heel or rotating on the mat results in increased friction, therby increasing the torque forces.

    If the employee is obese and not wearing orthotics…that would be my first recommendation, and then addressing the behavioural aspect of improving fitness.

    in reply to: Keyboard tray ‘Bounce’ #37989

    JB
    Participant

    Let’s not forget the behavioural approach to ergonomics. I do agree that Keyboard bounce can be excessive with certain models, hoever it is interesting to observe how much keystroking force some employees exert. Light touch keyboards can enable an employee to depress keys with less force thus decreasing their cumulative keyboarding force. Over an 8 hour day, this can be quite significant.

    Point being made………teaching employees to limit keyboarding force can enable an employee to control “excessive force” thus decrease any excessive “bouncing” Try to type with a softer touch in your next post and see how manageable it is………..food for thought

    in reply to: Mouse Clicks #38319

    JB
    Participant

    The complexity of thresholds and cumulative loading is a much debated topic these days. I recently attended the Advances in Ergonomics workshop hosted by the School of Physical and Health Education, Queen’s University where both Joan Stevenson and Linda McLean provided some interesting insight towards upper and lower extremity musculoskeltal disorders.

    I especially enjoyed Linda McLean’s (Ph.D), quick but informative, presentation about “Repetitive Strain Injuries” and the increasing number of Canadians (1 in 10) suffering from “RSI”. Ms. McLean appeared to be quite versed in this topic and a quick little background check indicated she has been part of many studies regarding the topic. The most interesting point (one of many) she made was that muscle injury occuring from 2-3% MVC (keystoking/mousing) was still poorly understood. Ms. McLean also identified the mechanisms of injury to include nerve gliding, impedence of axoplasmic flow, and compression as the possible synergists to cumulative loading injuries.

    My overall impression from this discussion leads me to believe that it is getting harder and harder to hang your hat on “guidelines” to represent thresholds. I would encourage all of us to keep current with evidence based research and keep our eyes on those like Linda McLean and Joan Stevenson to provide us with the information we are always looking for to help resolve or manage occupational related issues.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 45 total)
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